Podcast# 69, 999 Years of Irish History (part 2)

 

Track List:

Kilmaine Saints – Wearing of the Green
Auld Corn Brigade – Irish soldier laddie
The Brazen Heads – Wind That Shakes The Barley
Black 47 – Vinegar Hill
Barney Murray – Glory, Glory Oh
The Battering Ram – Henry Joy
The Town Pants – Kelly The Boy From Killanne
The Battering Ram – General Munro
Shane MacGowan and the Popes – Roddy McCorley
The Porters – The Rising of the Moon
Neck – Back Home In Derry

The Penal Laws:

So you thought the last 600 years of Irish history was crappy, well those were actually the good ‘oul days. With the Irish Catholic army in France and William light footed elsewhere the fully Protestant parliament in Dublin break every agreement in the treaty using the excuse that the Pope now was recognizing Jimmy Deuce as the rightfully King of Ireland and England, allowing them to consolidate their power and destroy any remaining Catholic power in the country. The laws they brought in were called The Penal Laws and were social engineering at its worst, designed to impoverish and disenfranchise the Catholic population. The modern equivalent would be the apartheid laws in South Africa – and like apartheid they were all about keeping the power and wealth within a select group rater then to force Catholics to convert (as much a apartheid was designed to change skin color) though the laws were structured that if a son of a wealthy landowner converted then he would inherit all the fathers property (sometimes this was encouraged within family’s when one converted and the rest prayed for his eternal soul) ,if there was no conversion then the land was subdivided between all sons. Education, voting and property rights were banned as was carrying of any weapons and the ownership of horses was restricted. Churches were closed and Popish priests would be exacted if caught in the country. Ironically, the Presbyterians in Ulster who supported Willie and held out against Jimbo in Derry were also subject to the Penal Laws – their faith was not recognized at all and while a Catholic priest would be boiled, burned and beheaded if caught in the country his sacraments were still recognized by the state as valid – marriages the Presbyterians minister performed were not though they didn’t have to fear the being anyone’s barbecue – thousands of these dissenters left for North America and within a couple of generations they had their revenge and made life very difficult for the British in the colonies before becoming the original Hillbillies and Red Necks of the American South. “I bet you can squeal like a pig. Yah Fenian bastard!”

The Treat of Limerick – not worth the stone it was written on

 No Pope Here

Through out the 1700’s thing in Ireland got worse and worse and the Catholic population ground into poverty or left the county for the armies of Europe or education in the Irish Colleges in Paris or Rome. Famine broke out twice in the 1700 yet the Landlord class built large palatial mansions and ruled over estates of tens of thousands of acres with thousand of tenant farmers living hand to mouth eating the only crop that could grow on their miserable few acres that would feed their brood of 25 red headed runts, the potato. If a tenant improved his land then the rent was raised, if another tenant offered more rent for another tenants land then that land went to the highest bidder and the original tenant was thrown off the land. Pretty suckie! If you every visit Ireland make sure you visit Castletown House outside Dublin (Celbridge) and take the tour. The house is the largest house in Ireland built by William Conelly, the speaker of the Dublin parliament who made a fortune through taking over the land of the disposed in the early 1700’s and as the tour guide in the plummy West-Brit accent tells you about the wonderful life of the inhabitants of the big house, stick yer paw up and ask about the Irish in their mud cabin out the back who were paying for the parasites life style – it’s great to watch ’em squirm.

 File:Front Elevation, Castletown House - geograph.org.uk - 1008011.jpgCastletown House

A Mud Cabin

The United Irishmen:

In the 1776 the world shifted on its axis and 13 British Colonies declared independence and Ireland and especially Ulster with its close ties to the Americas (family ties so close that family trees were often just trunks) got cowbell republican fever. Then in 1789 the other country that provided sanctuary to the Irish, France, fell to republicanism. Within 3 years of the fall of the Bastille in 1792 saw the formation of the Society of United Irishmen that combined liberal Protestants in Dublin and Belfast with the Catholic rump with the idea of revolution to bring in democracy to Ireland, leaders of the movement included Lord Edward Fitzgerald – the youngest son of the Duke of Leinster – who started his career as a Redcoat and was shot and left for dead at Yorktown being rescued from the battlefield by a slave, Wolfe Tone (not the group but the man, though they are old enough to have been around then) and Napper Tandy. From pamphlets they moved quickly to revolution and appeals to the new French dictator Napoleon to send troops to Invade Ireland. Ireland moved toward all out revolution. Wolfe Tone tries 3 times to bring the French to Ireland. In 1796, 43 French ships carrying 15,000 men got in sight of Bantry Bay but the “Protestant winds” stopped the landing, there was another attempt in 1797 but again the weather stopped the landing and a third attempt was undertake with 3,000 men but disaster struck and Tone and Tandy were captured at the Battle of Lough Swilly in October 1798 which ended the rebellion (and Tone’s life).

 

 The Capture of Lord Edward

Wolfe Tone

File:James Napper Tandy.jpg

I met with Napper Tandy and I shook him by the hand he said hold me up for chrissake for I can hardly stand.

The 1798 Rising:

Skipping back a few months to March 1798 and after a particularly riotous Paddy’s day martial law was imposed (well more due to informers actually) forcing the United Irishmen into action before the French could try to show up again – a small rebellion breaks out in Cahir, County Tipperary that is quickly crushed, then the United Irishmen planed to take Dublin but again the government had a hot line to the plans through Informers. Never the less rebellion breaks out in surrounding counties of Kildare (Barney Murray – Glory, Glory Oh), Carlow and Wicklow (Holt’s Way) and are all crushed quickly and brutally. The rebellion spreads to Ulster and Antrim (Roddy McCorley) and Down and after initial success the rebels are………you guessed it……..crushed. To the south in Wexford the biggest rebellion of all breaks out and under the leadership of the Catholic priest, Fr. John Murphy – who was initially a government loyalist but who turned after witnessing government brutality to his parishioners. The rebels quickly took over the county but defeats at the Battle of New Ross, Battle of Arklow, and the Battle of Bunclody halted the spread of the rebellion outside of the county. The government poured in 20,000 troops and the Irish and the Red Coats with support from German mercenaries met at Vinegar Hill. Despite the splendid leader ship of Fr. Murphy the rebels were poorly armed and trained and up against battle hardened regulars they are encircled and completely routed. Much butchery of the surrendering rebels and their civilian followers followed – Fr Murphy was stripped, flogged, hanged, decapitated, his corpse burnt in a barrel of tar and his head impaled on a spike (not quite water-boarding but almost as bad).

http://teachnet.eu/tobrien/files/Batlle-of-Enniscorthy.jpg

The Battle of New Ross

File:Vinhill.gif

Vinegar Hill

 The Republic of Connaught:

Meanwhile across the country in Mayo, a small advance party of French Solders under the command of General Jean Joseph Amable Humbert land and they are met by the local muckers and the local branch of the United Irishmen. They quickly defeat the yeomanry and march on the 6,000 red coats hanging out in Castlebar. Faced with 1,000 Frenchmen and 1,000 bogmen with pikes (big stick with points on one end) in front of them the Redcoats turn and run and the battle becomes know in local legend as the Castlebar Races – the Redcoats, not pursued a mile or two beyond Castlebar they did not stop running until reaching Tuam, with some units fleeing as far as Athlone in the panic. After Castlebar the French/Irish army tries to march across the country and meet up with rebels in the midlands with the plan of taking Dublin. They made it to the midlands but like all good Irish battle they out on the losing end at the Battle of Ballinamuck. The French troops who surrender got off easily and were exchanged for British prisoners held by the French – the Irish, well those who weren’t killed in battle were  executed by Lord Cornwallis orders (he who lost America for the crown). The novel The Year of The French by Thomas Flanagan based on the French landing is highly recommended.

The British Army

Robert Emmet:

The rebellion was essentially over by October 1798 though some rebels held out in the hill and the bogs and with a small rebellion breaking out (more a street fight) led by Robert Emmet 1803. Emmet was the brother of Thomas a leader of the United Irishmen who managed to escape to New York. Emmet nearly escaped but the old romantic went to see his mott and was caught. He was tried for treason in front of hanging judge, Lord Norbury with his defense lawyer bribed by the crown. After he is sentenced to death the judge makes the mistake of asking Emmet “What have you, therefore, now to say why judgment of death and execution shall not be awarded against you according to law?”.

Emmet didn’t hold back and delivered one of the greatest speeches of history – ask Old Abe Lincoln – but it didn’t do him much good for the mortal world and he was hung, drawn and quartered (hung till your nearly dead, dragged behind horses  and then cut in 4 pieces after he head is lobbed off by an axe).

 

“What have I to say why sentence of death should not be pronounced on me, according to law?

I have nothing to say which can alter your predetermination, not that it would become me to say with any view to the mitigation of that Sentence which you are here to pronounce, and by which I must abide. But I have that to say which interests me more than life, and which you have laboured, as was necessarily your office in the present circumstances of this oppressed country to destroy. I have much to say why my reputation should be rescued from the load of false accusation and calumny which has been heaped upon it. I do not imagine that, seated where you are, your minds can be so free from impurity as to receive the least impression from what I am about to utter. I have no hope that I can anchor my character in the breast of a court constituted and trammelled as this is. I only wish, and it is the utmost I expect. that your lordships may suffer it to float down your memories untainted by the foul breath of prejudice, until it finds some more hospitable harbour to shelter it from the rude storm by which it is at present buffeted.

Were I only to suffer death, after being adjudged guilty by your tribunal, I should bow in silence, meet the fate that awaits me without a murmur; but the sentence of the law which delivers my body to the executioner, will, through the ministry of the law, labour in its own vindication to consign my character to obloquy, for there must be guilt somewhere—whether in the sentence of the court, or in the catastrophes posterity must determine. A man in my situation, my lords, has not only to encounter the difficulties of fortune, and the force of power over minds which it has corrupted or subjugated, but the difficulties of established prejudice. The man dies, but his memory lives. That mine may not perish, that it may live in the respect of my countrymen, I seize upon this opportunity to vindicate myself from some of the charges alleged against me. When my spirit shall be wafted to a more friendly port—when my shade shall have joined the bands of those martyred heroes, who have shed their blood on the scaffold and in the field in defence of their country and of virtue, this is my hope—I wish that my memory and name may animate those who survive me, while I look down with complacency on the destruction of that perfidious government which upholds its domination by blasphemy of the Most High—which displays its power over man is over the beasts of the forest—which set man upon his brother, and lifts his hand, in the name of God, against the throat of his fellow who believes or doubts a little more or a little less than the government standard—a government which is steeled to barbarity by the cries of the orphans and the tears of the widows which it has made.

Lord Norbury— “The weak and wicked enthusiasts who feel as you feel are unequal to the accomplishment of their wild designs”.

I appeal to the immaculate God—I swear by the Throne of Heaven, before which I must shortly appear—by the blood of the murdered patriots who have gone before me—that my conduct has been, through all this peril, and through all my purposes, governed only by the convictions which I have uttered, and by no other view than that of the emancipation of my country from the superinhuman oppression under which she has so long and too patiently travailed; and I confidently and assuredly hope that, wild and chimerical as it may appear, there is still union and strength in Ireland to accomplish this noblest enterprise. Of this I speak with the confidence of intimate knowledge, and with the consolation that appertains to that confidence, think not, my lords, that I say this for the petty gratification of giving you a transitory uneasiness. A man who never yet raised his voice to assert a lie will not hazard his character with posterity by asserting a falsehood on a subject so important to his country, and on an occasion like this. Yes, my lords, a man who does not wish to have his epitaph written until his country is liberated will not leave a weapon in the power of envy, nor a pretence to impeach the probity which he means to preserve, even in the grave to which tyranny consigns him.

Lord Norbury — “You proceed to unwarrantable lengths, in order to exasperate or delude the unwary, and circulate opinions of the most dangerous tendency, for purposes of mischief”.

Again I say that what I have spoken was not intended for your lordship, whose situation I commiserate rather than envy—my expressions were for my countrymen. If there is a true Irishman present, let my last words cheer him in the hour of his affliction—

Lord Norbury— ”What you have hitherto said confirms and justifies the verdict of the jury”.

I have always understood it to be the duty of a judge, when a prisoner has been convicted, to pronounce the sentence of the law. I have also understood that judges sometimes think it their duty to hear with patience, and to speak with humanity; to exhort the victim of the laws, and to offer, with tender benignity, their opinions of the motives by which he was actuated in the crime of which he was adjudged guilty. That a judge has thought it his duty so to have done, I have no doubt; but where is that boasted freedom of your institutions—where is the vaunted impartiality, clemency, and mildness of your courts of justice, if an unfortunate prisoner, whom your policy, and not your justice, is about to deliver into the hands of the executioner, is not suffered to explain his motives sincerely and truly, and to vindicate the principles by which he was actuated?

My lords, it may be a part of the system of angry justice to bow a man’s mind by humiliation to the purposed ignominy of the scaffold; but worse to me than the purposed shame or the scaffold’s terrors would be the shame of such foul and unfounded imputations as have been laid against me in this court. You, my lord, are a judge; I am the supposed culprit. I am a man; you are a man also. By a revolution of power we might change places, though we could never change characters. If I stand at the bar of this court and dare not vindicate my character, what a farce is your justice? If I stand at this bar and dare not vindicate my character, how dare you calumniate it? Does the sentence of death, which your unhallowed policy inflicts upon my body, also condemn my tongue to silence and my reputation to reproach? Your executioner may abridge the period of my existence, but, while I exist, I shall not forbear to vindicate my character and motives from your aspersions; as a man to whom fame is dearer than life, I will make the last use of that life in doing justice to that reputation which is to live after me, and which is the only legacy I can leave to those I honour and love, and for whom I am proud to perish.

As men, my lord, we must appear on the great day at one common tribunal, and it will then remain for the Searcher of all hearts to show a collective universe who was engaged in the most virtuous actions or actuated by the purest motives—my country’s oppressor, or—

Lord Norbury— ”Stop, sir! Listen to the sentence of the law”.

My lord, shall a dying man be denied the legal privilege of exculpating himself in the eyes of the community from an undeserved reproach thrown upon him during his trial, by charging him with ambition, and attempting to cast away for a paltry consideration the liberties of his country? Why did your lordship insult me? Or rather, why insult justice in demanding of me why sentence of death should not be pronounced? I know, my lord, that form prescribes that you should ask the question. The form also presumes the right of answering. This, no doubt, may be dispensed with, and so might the whole ceremony of the trial, since sentence was already pronounced at the Castle before your jury were empanelled. Your lordships are but the priests of the oracle. I submit to the sacrifice; but I insist on the whole of the forms.

Lord Norbury— “You may proceed, sir”.

I am charged with being an emissary of France. An emissary of France! And for what end? It is alleged that I wish to sell the independence of my country; and for what end? Was this the object of my ambition? And is this the mode by which a tribunal of justice reconciles contradictions? No; I am no emissary.

My ambition was to hold a place among the deliverers of my country—not in power, not in profit, but in the glory of the achievement. Sell my country’s independence to France! And for what? A change of masters? No; but for my ambition. Oh, my country! Was it personal ambition that influenced me? Had it been the soul of my actions, could I not, by my education and fortune, by the rank and consideration of my family, have placed myself amongst the proudest of your oppressors? My country was my idol. To it I sacrificed every selfish, every endearing sentiment; and for it I now offer myself, O God! No, my lords; I acted a an Irishman, determined on delivering my country from the yoke of a foreign and unrelenting tyranny, and from the more galling yoke of a domestic faction, its joint partner and perpetrator in the patricide, whose reward is the ignominy of existing with an exterior of splendour and a consciousness of depravity. It was the wish of my heart to extricate my country from this doubly-riveted despotism—I wish to place her independence beyond the reach of any power on earth. I wish to exalt her to that proud station in the world which Providence had destined her to fill. Connection with France was, indeed, intended, but only so far as mutual interest would sanction or require.

Were the French to assume any authority inconsistent with the purest independence, it would be the signal for their destruction. We sought their aid— and we sought it as we had assurances we should obtain it—as auxiliaries in war, and allies in peace. Were the French to come as invaders or enemies, uninvited by the wishes of the people, I should oppose them to the utmost of my strength. Yes! My countrymen, I should advise you to meet them on the beach with a sword in one hand and a torch in the other. I would meet them with all the destructive fury of war, and I would animate my countrymen to immolate them in their boats before they had contaminated the soil of my country. If they succeeded in landing, and if forced to retire before superior discipline, I would dispute every inch of ground, raze every house, burn every blade of grass; the last spot on which the hope of freedom should desert me, there would I hold, and the last of liberty should be my grave.

What I could not do myself in my fall, I should leave as a last charge to my countrymen to accomplish; because I should feel conscious that life, any more than death, is dishonourable when a foreign nation holds my country in subjection. But it was not as an enemy that the succours of France were to land. I looked, indeed, for the assistance of France; I wished to prove to France and to the world that Irishmen deserved to be assisted—that they were indignant at slavery, and ready to assert the independence and liberty of their country; I wished to procure for my country the guarantee which Washington procured for America—to procure an aid which, by its example, would be as important as its valour; disciplined, gallant, pregnant with science and experience; that of allies who would perceive the good, and polish the rough points of our character. They would come to us as strangers, and leave us as friends, after sharing in our perils, and elevating our destiny. These were my objects; not to receive new taskmasters, but to expel old tyrants. And it was for these ends I sought aid from France; because France, even as an enemy, could not be more implacable than the enemy already in the bosom of my country.

Lord Norbury— ”You are making an avowal of dreadful treasons, and of a determined purpose to have persevered in them, which I do believe, has astonished your audience”.

I have been charged with that importance in the efforts to emancipate my country, as to be considered the keystone of the combination of Irishmen, or, as your lordship expressed it, “the life and blood of the conspiracy”. You do me honour overmuch; you have given to a subaltern all the credit of a superior. There are men engaged in this conspiracy who are not only superior to me; but even to your own conception of yourself, my lord; men before the splendour of whose genius and virtues I should bow with respectful deference, and who would think themselves disgraced by shaking your bloodstained hand—

Lord Norbury— “You have endeavoured to establish a wicked and bloody provisional government”.

What, my lord! shall you tell me, on the passage to the scaffold, which that tyranny, of which you are only the intermediary executioner, has erected for my murder, that I am accountable for all the blood that has been and will be shed in this struggle of the oppressed against the oppressor? Shall you tell me this, and must I be so very as slave as not to repel it?

Lord Norbury— “A different conduct would have better become one who had endeavoured to overthrow the laws and liberties of his country”.

I who fear not to approach the Omnipotent Judge to answer for the conduct of my whole life, am I to be appalled and falsified by a mere remnant of mortality here? By you, too, who if it were possible to collect all the innocent blood that you have shed in your unhallowed ministry in one great reservoir, your lordship might swim in it.

Lord Norbury—“I exhort you not to depart this life with such sentiments of rooted hostility to your country as those which you have expressed’.

Let no man dare, when I am dead, to charge me with dishonour; let no man attaint my memory by believing that I could have engaged in any cause but that of my country’s liberty and independence; or that I could have become the pliant minion of power in the oppression and misery of my countrymen. The proclamation of the Provisional Government speaks for my views; no inference can be tortured from it to countenance barbarity or debasement at home, or subjection, humiliation, or treachery from abroad. I would not have submitted to a foreign oppressor, for the same reason that I would resist the domestic tyrant. In the dignity of freedom, I would have fought upon the threshold of my country, and its enemy should only enter by passing over my lifeless corpse. And am I, who lived but for my country, who have subjected myself to the dangers of the jealous and watchful oppressor, and now to the bondage of the grave, only to give my countrymen their rights, and my country her independence—am I to be loaded with calumny and not suffered to resent it? No, God forbid!

Here Lord Norbury told Emmet that his sentiments and language disgraced his family and his education, but more particularly his father, Dr. Emmet, who was a man, if alive, that would not countenance such opinions. To which Emmet replied:—

If the spirits of the illustrious dead participate in the concerns and cares of those who were dear to them in this transitory life, O! ever dear and venerated shade of my departed father, look down with scrutiny upon the conduct of your suffering son, and see if I have, even for a moment, deviated from those principles of morality and patriotism which it was your care to instil into my youthful mind, and for which I am now about to offer up my life. My lords, you seem impatient for the sacrifice. The blood for which you thirst is not congealed by the artificial terrors which surround your victim [the soldiery filled and surrounded the Sessions House]—it circulates warmly and unruffled through the channels which God created for noble purposes, but which you are now bent to destroy, for purposes so grievous that they cry to heaven. Be yet patient! I have but a few words more to say. I am going to my cold and silent grave; my lamp of life is nearly extinguished; my race is run; the grave opens to receive me, and I sink into its bosom.

I have but one request to ask at my departure from this world; it is—THE CHARITY OF ITS SILENCE. Let no man write my epitaph; for as no man who knows my motives dare now vindicate them, let not prejudice or ignorance asperse them. Let them and me rest in obscurity and peace, and my name remain uninscribed, until other times and other men can do justice to my character. When my country takes her place among the nations of the earth, then, and not till then, let my epitaph be written. I have done.

 

The Act of Union:

The government in London finally had enough of the mismanagement of Ireland by the Protestant ascendancy in Dublin – they could do a much better job of the mismanagement of Ireland.  In 1800 the two parliaments were joined in London and the Dublin parliament dissolved (and any member of the Dublin parliament who disagreed was bought off….cheap)

Shite’n’Onions Podcast#61

Shite’n’Onions Podcast#61: Featuring the best of Celtic and folk punk. We have new music from The Mahones and Tomfooligans as well as some deep dives into the Shite’n’Onions vault with classics from Blood Or Whiskey and Neck plus the best of the latest releases.We also have a very unusual cover and to protect the guilty the name of the band is to be withheld.
Surfin’ Turnips – Scrumpy Swillin Time Again
The Mahones – Angels & Devils
Handsome Young Strangers – Augathela Station
Tomfooligans – McGregor’s Pipes
Blood Or Whiskey – Your Majesty
Bastards on Parade – St Patrick’s Day
The Langer’s Ball – Mackey’s Daughter
The Gobshites – Guinness Boys
The Dreadnoughts – Grace O’Malley
The Fighting Jamesons – Johnny On The Island
Siobhan – Jakey’s Gone To Germany
Across The Border – Soldier John
Auld Corn Brigade – A Mother’s Heart
Bodh’aktan – La ballade de Jonathan Lewis
Charm City Saints – Dicey Riley
The Mighty Regis – Real Deal Irish
Neck – A Fistful Of Shamrock
Not Revealed – to protect the guilty

Podcast #56 – more odd’s and sods

Podcast 56 is now up on iTunes and available via the android app or you can listen right here…..

We have new music from CA’s Brick Top Blaggers, Circle J from The Netherlands and Craic Brothers from OH.

Along with favorites from The Ramshackle Army, BibleCodeSundays, Frank Mackey And The Keltic Cowboys, Neck, Currency, McDermott’s 2 Hours.

Also we have from the new The Radiators From Space (Phil from THE POGUES) album, SOUND CITY BEAT, a classic cover of THIN LIZZY’s DUBLIN

Shite’n’Onions App for Android phones:

Shite’n’Onions App for iPhones:

Shite’n’Onions Podcast#52 – St. Patrick’s Day #1

Happy St. Patrick’s Day from us here at Shite’n’Onions. On podcast #52 we got plenty of standards both old and new.

Neck – Every Day’s St Patrick’s Day
Big Bad Bollocks – Guinness
The Gobshites – I Only Drink Stout
Blaggard – Bog Songs
Blood Or Whiskey – Follow Me up to Carlow-Holt’s Way
Lexington Field – Galway Bay
Circle J – Marry Mcqueen
The Rumjacks – I’ll Tell Me Ma!
Black 47 – Vinegar Hill
The Skels – Young Roddy McCorley -Kelly the Boy from Killan
The Porters – The Rising Of The Moon
Auld Corn Brigade – Sean South from Garryowen
Smokey Bastards – My Son John
The Mahones – Give It All Ya Got (Or Forget About It)
Fiddler’s Green – Highland Road
Nogoodnix – Muirsheen Durkin
The Mighty Regis – Paddy Don’t Live In Hollywood
Devil’s Advocates – The Ones Behind the Wire
Luke Kelly – A Nation Once Again

Shite’n’Onions App for Android phones:

Shite’n’Onions App for iPhones:

Shite’n’Onions Podcast#46 JACK FLASH

Podcast#46 featuring the new full length from Australia’s JackFlash

Jackflash – Rebel’s Revenge (Jackflash)
Jackflash – Augathella Station (Jackflash)
Neck – Psycho Ceilidh Mayhem Set (Sod ’em & Begorrah)
The Radiators From Space – Hinterland (Trouble Pilgrim)
The Authority!-If I Should Fall From Grace With God (Scene Killer Vol2)
Black 47 – Livin’ In America – 11 Years on /with Mary Courtney (New York Town)
The Langer’s Ball – As I Roved Out (Live — Drunk Sick Tired)
The Rumjacks – The Bold Rumjacker (Hung Drawn & Potered)
Siobhan – Jakey’s Gone To Germany (Welfare State)
Neck- The Fields Of Athenry (EP)
Lexington Field – Holes In Our Hearts (Old Dirt Road)
Kevin Flynn & The Avondale Ramblers – The Devil & Dr Holmes (The Murderer The Thief The Minstrels & The Rest)
Junkman’s Choir – Sawney Beane
Jackflash – Shearers Strike (Jackflash)
Jackflash – Queensberry Rules (Jackflash)

Jack Flash is a Toowoomba born and based folk/punk six-piece with a unique brand of catchy, dancing tunes, lyrical genius and fancy flair. Originating in the spring of 2006 they developed a style which brings traditional Australian folk sounds and themes to a punk audience.

Jack Flash is influenced by such acts as Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphy’s, Red Gum, The Pogues and The Bushwhackers Band. Drawing on a rich background of Australian, Celtic and American tunes, the Jack Flash boys have forged their own sound and deliver a fresh contribution to the Folk/Punk genre.

In the past four years the band has performed extensively around South East Queensland, with regular forays into New South Wales and Victoria. Jack Flash have had the honour of sharing the stage with a multitude of highly acclaimed international and local acts, including Leftover Crack (USA), Pack (Switz.), KC & The Moonshine Band (Canada), Unpaid Debt, Zombie Ghost Train, The Go Set, Sydney City Trash, Steve Towson, Blowhard and The Quickening

http://www.myspace.com/jackflashband

http://www.shitenonions.com

Direct download: ShitenOnions_podcast_46_Jack_Flash.mp3

Shite’n’Onions Podcast#38, Paddy’s Day count down, featuring THE GOBSHITES

Counting down to St. Partricks Day! Our featured CD is the just released “Songs Me Da’ Got Pissed to” from Boston’s own THE GOBSHITES.

Neck – Every Day’s St Patrick’s Day – Sod ’em & Begorrah

The Gobshites – The Moonshiner – Songs Me Da’ Got Pissed to

The Gobshites – Seven Drunken Nights – Songs Me Da’ Got Pissed to

Hit The Bottle Boys – The Recruiting Sergeant

Icewagon FLU – South Australia – The Waxie’s Dargle Single

The Mahones – Celtic Pride – Irish Punk Collection

Jackdaw – Black And Tans – Armed And Legged

The Rumjacks – Uncle Tommy – Gangs of New Holland

The Gobshites – Drunken Night In Dublin- Songs Me Da’ Got Pissed to

Kilmaine Saints – The Saints are Up! – The Good, The Plaid, and The Ugly

The Dreadnoughts – Fire Marshall Willy – Legends Never Die

The Gobshites – Limerick- Songs Me Da’ Got Pissed to

The Gobshites – Beer Beer Beer- Songs Me Da’ Got Pissed to


Neck – 2011 European Tour

Feb 11 – Fenix, Sittard, THE NETHERLANDS – 20:00
Feb 12 – East Club, Bischofswerda, Sachsen, GERMANY – 20:00
Feb 13 – Paradox Ingolstadt, Ingolstadt, Bayern, GERMANY – 19:30
Feb 14 – Hafenkneipe, Zürich, TBA, SWITZERLAND – 19:30
Feb 15 – Birreria, Saint Gallen, SWITZERLAND – 19:30
Feb 17 – Melodka Klub, Brno-Veveří, CZECH REPUBLIC – 20:00
Feb 18 – Finnegan’s Irish Pub, Altenburg, TBA, GERMANY – 20:30
Feb 20 – Hedon Zwolle, Overijssel, THE NETHERLANDS – 20:00

http://www.neck.ie/

Shite’n’Onions Podcast#31 feat. The Rumjacks, Gangs of New Holland

Featured CD – “Gangs of New Holland” by the The Rumjacks.

The Rumjacks – Uncle Tommy – Gangs of New Holland

The Rumjacks – Spit In The Street – Gangs of New Holland

Pete Berwick – Is that what you’re telling me – Give it Time

Bastards on Parade – Captains Dargle – Death Shore Pirates

The Rumjacks – Jolly Executioner – Gangs of New Holland

Circle J – Weekend Warriors – Weekend Warriors

Flatfoot 56 – Born For This – Blackthorn

The Go Set – New Race – Rising

Neck – Blue Skies Over Nenagh – Sod ’em & Begorrah

Bat Kinane – The Intrepid Fox – A lifetime to kill

The Rumjacks – Green Ginger Wine – Gangs of New Holland

Direct download from:

http://shitenonions.libsyn.com/shite-n-onions-podcast-31-feat-the-rumjacks-gangs-of-new-holland

of via iTunes

http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/shite-n-onions/id329380182

Neck: Come Out Fighting

Anyone who’s been a long time reader of S’n’O will know that we here at Shite’n’Onions towers have been long time fans of the London based underdogs. In fact we nicked our bloody name from a Neck instrumental. So it’s with confidence we can say that not only is “Come Out Fighting” Neck’s best to date but it’s also one of the best Celtic-punk releases ever! In fact I could argue that both the band Neck and release “Come Out Fighting” defines what Celtic-punk is. Neck are rooted with one foot in Celtic music and one foot in punk unlike any other group. The attitude is punk, the guitars are strung with razor wire and so feckin incredibly loud!!!!!!!!! the band is steeped at the same time in traditional music – this isn’t a case of a band looking up the Clancy Brother on iTunes for material – this stuff is in their blood. If you’ve never heard Celtic Punk before and wonder what the fuss is about then there isn’t a better introduction then  “Come Out Fighting” (and oh yeah Pat Collier did an amazing job on the production)

http://www.neck.ie/
http://www.myspace.com/neckireland

NECK — ‘COME OUT FIGHTING!’

NECK  — ‘COME OUT FIGHTING!’
Album release announcement:

Howyiz everyone!

Well, at long fe*kin’ last! – We here at Neck Towers are chuffed to announce the final, h-official release date for our début album on Golf Records ‘Come out Fighting!’ (& pretty apt a title it is) & it’s…  –  drum roll, gasps of incredulity & an involuntary orgasm by a far-too over excitable young fella from Sidcup!  –  …  OCTOBER 26th 2009!!!!!!!!!!!!

There are 14 tracks on ‘Come out Fighting!’ – all recorded with legendary Producer, Pat Collier (originally in ’76 Punk Rock legends The Vibrators, Pat made his name producing The Wonderstuff & has since worked with virtually everyone in your record collection – including Lars Friedrikson!).

Pat’s definitely brought out the best in us: it is, without a shadow of a doubt, the best sounding, most powerful album we’ve ever made! He’s given us a new, more focussed, lean & muscular sound – & in depth: There’s the usual range of ‘Up & at ’em’ Impassioned hIrish Punk Rock Polemic, replete with Pop-tastic Harmonies & the fave Neck ‘Now-you’re-moshing-now-you’re-Riverdancing-now-you’re-moshing-again!’ trick; ‘Necked-up’ Traditional Irish rousers, ballads & Jigs; (& even a sh*ggin’ Irish Power Ballad fer Chrissakes!) – just all louder, clearer, more powerful and more ‘swirlier’!

So – on the back of growing live successes over the last few years
(we’re getting approached by more festivals in the USA, Europe & the UK than ever before – resulting in 2 U.S. trips last year; our 6th Glastonbury and Rebellion; & headlining or closing stages at festivals in the UK & Europe now!)
– we’re in the process of putting some dates together to promote the album in the UK, Europe &, if we’re lucky, even the USA again – I’ll defo be after prayin’ to St. Meiriceá – the patron saint of gettin’ our sorry arses back over Stateside!

So stand-by for more announcements! And if you want us to come play in your town – drop us a line…

AND – we’ll be putting some free Download bundles together, prior to the album release – AND this yokes gettin’ a complete re-vamp for it too, so watch this (My)space!

Here are a couple of reviews of the album we’ve already had:

“Come out Fighting!’ – a full-on and in your face aural assault. A record that combines the pathos of The Pogues, the folk lilt of The Levellers and the punchiness of Stiff Little Fingers to mesmerising effect.” –  Big Cheese Magazine, UK

“…easily as good as The Pogues ever got…they go to all the places Flogging Molly or Dropkick Murphys do but with  more first hand closer to the bone reality. Neck’s finest moment yet and another fine hooley of an album by the best Irish Punk band in the world!”
–  Organ magazine, UK

“…it’s a muscular, lean, musical hay-maker that can stand it’s ground & slug it out with the best of ’em!”

NECK  — ‘COME OUT FIGHTING!’  CD Album
Golf Records [UK & Europe] (CAT #CDHole179) – release date 26/10/09
Abstract Records [USA] (CAT #tba ) – release date tba